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Culinary Congress Top 9

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On 6 June, Charles Banks has launched a new food and drink event at Hawker House Street Feast. Sixteen of the worlds most respected, awarded and innovation led chefs showed us what they could do, and more interestingly, told us what they believed in.

New Beginnings

Nearly everyone was blending flavours and seasonings from other cuisines and countries. Sabrina Ghayour (British Iranian) felt this is how you breathed new life in to old favourites. Flavours and seasonings mentioned frequently included; Sumac, miso, sorrel, smoked paprika.

DIY

Many ground-breaking Michelin starred chefs are now self-taught; Judy Juu – American Korean, Sabrina Ghayour – British Iranian, meaning that they are less bound by old tradition.

Although, Pierre Kauffman noted it was sad that the art of making a really good, authentic sauce was less prevalent in cooking today… are the two connected?

Low and Slow

We saw Pierre Kauffman using Sous Vide/Low temps to cook salmon steaks, Justin James marinating brisket to make pastrami and Judy Juu pickling/smoking eggs at 68 degrees in Lapsang tea. Using warm temperatures often retains flavours instead of damaging defining qualities.

Nation’s USPs

France: Technique
Italian: Ingredients
UK: Innovation
China: Pork
Japan: Fish
Korea: Beef
North India: Ghee
South India: Coconut
East India: Peanut
West India: Mustard oil

  • France: Technique
  • Italian: Ingredients
  • UK: Innovation
  • China: Pork
  • Japan: Fish
  • Korea: Beef
  • North India: Ghee
  • South India: Coconut
  • East India: Peanut
  • West India: Mustard oil

The new vibrant Kool;

K is for Korea says Iron Chef Judy Juu. Their approach to food is a dichotomy, whilst food is medicine with a balance of the 5 flavours, textures and colours/ying and yang, they then dial it up to extremes and make it Kool, just like their K-dramas and K-Pop.

Claire Clark reflected this new global extreme vibrancy in her UK patisserie, using bright clashing colours, glitter and flowers. She also predicted the ruby chocolate trend.

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ISSUE 14

All In.

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